Market Dominating Position – Part 2

Posted by nancybaki on July 8, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

CREATING A MARKET DOMINATING POSITION INVOLVES A FIVE STEP PROCESS.

 

Step number 1: Determine Your Strategic Position in the Market

What specific niche market or segment of the marketplace should your business focus on? Determining this involves combining the skills your business has with the unmet needs of your targeted prospects and then designing your product or service to fulfill those needs. Domino’s strategic position was “fast hot pizza for hungry college kids.” For Starbucks, “delicious hand-crafted beverages that makes life better.”

 

Step number 2: Determine Your Primary Market Dominating Position

This is the most dominating advantage that separates you from your competitors. Domino’s claimed it could deliver its pizza in 30 minutes or less, or they would give it to you for FREE! This was the primary advantage that met the needs of their newly defined market position – hungry college kids that wanted food fast.

 

Step number 3: Determine Your Supporting Business Model

How will you specifically deliver what your strategic position and primary market dominating position promises? What changes, if any do you need to consider making to your business to ensure you deliver consistently on your position and your promise? Domino’s built a supporting business model that enabled them to consistently provide their promised primary advantage, which was fresh hot pizza delivered within 30 minutes. To make good on this promise every time, they were forced to create a supporting business model where they built low-cost, plain vanilla stores strategically located near college campuses. And since college kids aren’t the most reliable workers on the planet, they were forced to hire additional delivery staff and have additional drivers on a stand-by basis. Together, these innovations allowed them to consistently meet and often exceed their primary market dominating position.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step number 4: Determine Your Secondary Market Dominating Position

What additional competitive advantages does your business offer that your customers will perceive as being different from your competition? Domino’s secondary benefits might include special pricing, assorted sizes, a much broader selection of toppings or additional menu items.

 

Step number 5: Create Your Market Dominating Position Statement or Elevator Pitch

This is a simple statement you can create by combining steps one through four. This helps you to state unequivocally what differentiates you from your competitors to your targeted prospects and customers. Domino’s market dominating position is neatly summed up in its slogan, “fresh hot pizza delivered in 30 minutes or less, or it’s free.” An expanded version of this might say: “Domino’s provides busy customers with fresh hot pizza and other food items within 30 minutes or less. Our assorted pizza offerings combined with our value pricing makes Domino’s affordable to everyone.” This presentation will focus on helping you to define your market dominating position and then we can help you create a powerful and compelling elevator pitch that will effectively communicate your value to your marketplace.

 

After reviewing them, select the one or ones that best fit your individual business.

Category number one involves the level of service you provide.

 

Hope this read opened your eyes to opportunities that are missing in your business, apply and see the difference it will make in your business!

There are a total of six different areas where you can add value when it comes to service. We will cover that on the next article.

 

If you need help identifying your market dominating position,  try my FREE test drive to gain access to our resources and tools.

Check it out at www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com/guidedtour

To Your Success,

Nancy Baki at Best Entrepreneur Solutions

www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com

Market Dominating Position – Part 1

Posted by nancybaki on May 16, 2019

Image result for market dominating position

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know what is a Market Dominating Position?

Does your business have a Market Dominating Position?

 

The majority of small businesses are established in response to market demand for a product or service. Many build their businesses by serving that demand and enjoy growing profits without putting much effort into long-term planning or marketing.

However, what happens when that demand slows or stops?

What happens when the competition sets up shop with a “new and improved” version of your product down the road?

How do you keep your offering fresh while growing and maintaining your client base?

The answer, Innovate your business and offer extraordinary value by creating a “market dominating position.”

Consider this. Every choice you make when buying a product or a service represents a point of differentiation between one company and their competitors. These differences, whether subtle or distinct, determine which customers will buy what they sell.

 

Consider the well documented case of Domino’s Pizza.

Image result for dominoes pizza delivery

Why did Domino’s become a billion dollar behemoth in an overcrowded market in just a few years?

Did Domino’s make the best pizza? Not even close!

Did they offer comfortable in-house dining? No way!

Did they offer the largest selection on their menu? They offered the exact same pizza as ALL of their competitors!

They dominated by adopting and implementing one major strategy.

They created a market dominating position, which was fast hot pizza, targeted specifically for hungry college kids.

So now ask yourself what, if anything, makes your business different from your competitors as perceived by your targeted prospects and customers?

For the vast majority of businesses that answer is price.

So then consider today’s top selling companies.

Nike offers a wide range of shoes, apparel and equipment products, all of which are currently among the best sellers globally.

Image result for nike air jordan

As an example, the top selling Air Jordan 3 is currently selling for $150 and up.

And yet, Target sells an excellent imitation for around $40, but Nike outsells them by more than ten to one.

 

Have you bought a cup of coffee lately at Starbucks?

Image result for starbucks coffee

According to their latest data, their typical customer spends between $3.50 to $4.00 on every visit.

That’s around four times higher than any of their competition.

Obviously, low price isn’t the driving force here.

So what is?

The answer, these top selling companies have staked out a specific and targeted market dominating position.

For Nike, their position revolves around being the best athlete, being hip and in style along with the perception of quality.

For Starbucks, it’s delicious hand-crafted beverages which they claim is the secret to making life better.

 

When you create your own market dominating position, you will consistently get businesses and individuals to choose your business over your competitors.

But what exactly is a “market dominating position?”

It’s simply any value-added customer perceived benefit, or a combination of benefits, that differentiates you from your competitors; and does so in a strong enough manner that it makes your business the logical choice in the minds of your prospects and customers.

As an example, a dry cleaner that offers pick-up and delivery would be the only logical choice for any prospect or customer that values convenience.

This simple distinction represents a market dominating position.

The key is to create added value in everything you do.

Prospects and customers DON’T buy based on price.

They buy based on the value they receive for the price they pay.

Creating added value is a marketing or customer relations strategy that can take the form of a product or service that’s added to your original offering for free or as part of a discounted package.

Like all other elements in your marketing toolkit, it’s designed to attract new customers and retain existing ones.

Another simple example of added value would be a gift shop owner that offered complimentary gift wrapping with every purchase.

If you don’t revisit the value you offer, then over time your customers will be drawn to your competitor who consistently innovate their business so they offer exceptional value that you don’t.

Ultimately, your customers will demand additional value to remain loyal – and they’re the keystones for your business growth.

Everyone can add value to their business.

And adding value doesn’t have to blow your marketing budget or take up hours of your time.

There are many ways to enhance your business in the eyes of your clients.

 

Image result for key to success

The key to adding value is determining what your customers and target market perceive as valuable.

You must understand their needs, wants, troubles and inconveniences in order to entice them with solutions through added value products or services.

Adding value will also add to your profits, but if you don’t focus on genuinely helping your clients you’ll have a difficult time attracting them.

Added value works for both product and service-based businesses.

If you offer a service like hair styling, try treating your customers by offering them a latte while they wait, or complimentary shampoo samples or a free conditioning treatment with every sixth visit.

If you sell a product, consider offering convenience services like free shipping or delivery to make the customer’s experience a seamless one.

The customer will feel appreciated and their needs will have been taken care of.

 

I hope this read opened your eyes to opportunities that are missing in your business.

In the next blog I will help you understand how to create your business’ marketing dominating position.

 

If you need help identifying your market dominating position,  try my FREE test drive to gain access to our resources and tools.

Check it out at www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com/guidedtour

 

To Your Success,

Nancy Baki at Best Entrepreneur Solutions

www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com

How to Reactivate Past Clients – Part 2 – 8 Steps to Designing a Reactivation Campaign

Posted by nancybaki on April 12, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

As promised here are the 8 Steps to Designing a Reactivation Campaign

One of my clients just launched a fairly large reactivation campaign. While there are many ways to run a reactivation campaign, the following steps will set you on a straight path should you decide to launch one.

First, understand that a reactivation campaign is when you create a strategy around those sleepy subscribers. You want them to get back to opening your emails and engaging with them. This can help improve sales, click-throughs, website traffic, and more.

 

1- Who is your target?

Are these people who stopped buying from you six months ago? Three months? Twelve months? If you run a subscription service, are they people who canceled one month ago? Two weeks ago? Two years ago? Decide first who you want to try and reactivate. If someone bought from you four years ago and you’re just now getting around to sending them an e-mail, it’s probably too late. It’s OK to run a few different variations of the campaign if you want to target several different groups from above.

2- What’s your goal?

I’ll take a wild stab and say your goal is to either have these consumers buy from you again, re-subscribe to your services, or otherwise reengage with your company. But, are there more specific goals than that? Maybe you want to introduce a new product line, introduce a new account manager, or upsell them on something they already own (or a service they already use)?

3- Why did these consumers leave?

Unlike a normal marketing campaign, you need to understand why your consumers left. Did they not like your products? Were you too expensive? Did you not have enough content in their particular field to keep them interested? Knowing the reasons they probably left will enable you to craft a message that addresses those issues specifically.

4- What segmentation or persona data do you have?

If you can segment these consumers either by persona or by purchase habits, you can make your reactivation campaign that much more effective. The rules here are the same as for any direct marketing: don’t just send a mass “We want you back” e-mail. Instead, use whatever knowledge you have of the consumer in order to create a more relevant message.

5- Split test offers.

It’s fine to offer a reactivation discount code to these consumers. They were effectively “dead” anyhow, so you aren’t really losing a full-price purchase by offering them a discount. However, showing consumers that you understand them and have new offerings that meet their needs might just be enough. So, do a split test and create discounts for some percentage of the group, but not all of them. See how they do when compared to the group with no offer.

6- Focus on your content.

Instead of just saying, “We want you back, here’s 15% off,” make a real Show your consumers you understand them. If they used to buy video games, talk about all the new things that have happened in video games since they last checked your site out. If you run a content subscription-based site (like E-Learning), highlight the new content you’ve added to your site since they were last members. Put the relevant content first. Consumers can get a discount anywhere if they try. It’s your content and products (if they’re relevant) that will be more interesting to them.

7- Make it easy for them to come back.

If it has been a while, there’s a good chance your consumers don’t remember their usernames or passwords. Either send them this information (or at least their username) in the e-mail, or make it really easy for them to find it. If their account has “expired,” make it easy for them to renew without reentering all their information again. If you offered a discount code, make it very clear where they enter it.

8- Reach out via different channels.

Are these consumers on Twitter (and do they follow you)? If so, send them a direct message, not an e-mail. E-mail marketing is great, but try other channels if you have access to them.

 

Finally, realize the difference between a reactivation campaign and a regular campaign. While the above steps could be the recipe for any old marketing campaign, there is one important difference. Reactivation marketing needs to understand how long people have been gone, why they possibly left, what is different in your offerings now that would make them come back, and what (if any) incentive they might need to come back.

If you can’t answer, “What is different in our offerings that would make them come back,” then skip the reactivation campaign and focus on answering that question first!

 

You are more than welcome to take a FREE tour to see how I can help you grow your business:

Check it out at: www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com/guidedtour

To Your Success,

Nancy Baki at Best Entrepreneur Solutions

www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com

How to Reactivate Past Clients – Part 1

Posted by nancybaki on April 9, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reactivate stale or past Clients can bring you new customers…. Most businesses ignore them, successful businesses learn new ways to get them to recognize you as a market leader.

 

Remember that it’s 6-7 times more expensive to acquire a new customer than to keep an existing one

 

When trying to re-establish relationships with past customers, some customers will be comfortable and feel as if they just conducted business with you yesterday while others will wonder why you went to the trouble of contacting them.

 

Who is a reactivation candidate?

To reactivate customers, you need to be attentive to the process. First, to determine which previous customers to reactivate, define what reactivation specifically means for your organization. Most companies define reactivation candidates based on their lack of response to previous marketing efforts. The typical sequential marketing efforts that an organization may follow begin with acquisition, then proceed to resell / upsell / cross-sell / downsell, retention / competitive defense / selective attrition and then reactivation.

How do you differentiate between customers who require selling and retention efforts from those who require reactivation efforts? First, and most obviously, if you know that you’ve lost your customer’s business, then you’ve probably exhausted your sales and retention efforts and can assign the customer to your reactivation group.

If you don’t know whether you have lost your customer’s business, make inquiries. If you find that it’s too expensive to keep in touch with customers, then analyze their buying history (e.g., length of time since last purchase, number of prior purchases, length of time between purchases and average order size) or apply industry averages to determine who might be a reactivation candidate.

 

Whom do you select for reactivation?

Before designating customers as reactivation candidates, determine whether you have their correct contact information. Exclude past customers who have outdated information that cannot be updated through third-party sources.

Also, review any customer service or third-party data you have on reactivation candidates and categorize the reasons for lost business as “controllable” (e.g., shipped wrong product two weeks after promised delivery date) or “uncontrollable” (e.g., moved from retail area). If you’re to blame for the failed relationship, determine whether there is value in re-establishing it.

Once you select your reactivation candidates, segment this group and test offers before spending money to reach them all at once. If possible, use lifetime value to determine which segments may yield a higher return.

 

When do you conduct reactivation marketing?

Reactivation is not a one-time event for when times are tough. Reactivation should be an ongoing activity prioritized among other marketing efforts.

Once you have customers who meet your reactivation requirements, execute a reactivation campaign. (See “Reactivation Letters” in the Sales Letter Library). With response history, you can develop a reactivation response model to determine the optimal timing and frequency of your reactivation efforts. For example, a model developed for a health products cataloger might show that the company maximizes its marketing dollars when it tries to reactivate past customers with a buy-one-get-one-free offer after these customers fail to respond to three months of discount offers following their initial purchase.

When you accumulate significant response history from your reactivation marketing efforts, build a model based on RFM analysis (recency, frequency, monetary) or data attributes that predict purchase propensity. A life insurance company might build a model based on age, number of children, marital status, income and interest rates to determine the likelihood of a previous term insurance customer buying a variable life policy.

 

What do you say to customers you want to reactivate?

People change over time and so does your business, so when you’re thinking about marketing to past customers, consider that your customers’ needs and preferences, as well as your business focus, may have changed.

Profile customer’s to create more personalized communications for each segment. Use past data such as RFM information and, if possible, append reliable third-party information that will enhance your customer understanding. For example, you might use third-party information to determine each customer’s age, family situation and income. Then you could send targeted communications to various segments depending on these data attributes as well as results from an RFM analysis.

In conjunction with customer profiling, make an in-depth determination as to why the relationship ended in the first place. Was it something you did? If so, you might have a manager or high-level executive make a personal call to “high-value” customers.

When communicating with reactivation candidates, use the information you have about them in your marketing communications to show your desire to have them back as a customer. Also, if your communication is asking the reactivation candidate to call a person at your company, create a group of call specialists trained to handle reactivation customers.

 

Investing in acquisition vs. reactivation.

Acquisition and reactivation are both investments designed to yield profitable customer relationships. When deciding how much of your marketing budget should be allocated to each effort, calculate the ROI on reactivating old customers versus acquiring new customers.

Whether reactivation involves less of an investment than acquisition depends on the extent of your data analysis, data enhancement and list rental costs. It’s generally true that with customer data available for analysis as well as past customers’ familiarity with a company’s name and product or service quality, reactivation efforts yield higher response rates and higher profitability than acquisition efforts do.

 

Make the first move.

Most organizations focus on acquisition, sales to current customers and retention. They see little opportunity in marketing to people who failed to respond to their offers. These organizations, however, are typically not customer-focused.

Instead of trying to understand why a prior customer is no longer responding, they assume that the customer is the problem in the relationship. The dynamics are similar to that of a person who refuses to talk to another person unless the other person reaches out first. Start looking at your past customers and commit to reaching out and re-establishing a relationship that is valuable to both sides.

 

In my next blog I will show you the 8 Steps to Designing a Reactivation Campaign, stay tuned.

 

If you need help reactivating stale clients, try our FREE test drive to gain access to our resources and tools, or you can also contact me directly.

Check it out at www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com/guidedtour

To Your Success,

Nancy Baki at Best Entrepreneur Solutions

www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com

Tax Benefits for Your Business

Posted by nancybaki on March 29, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Mind Your Own Business!

The concept of minding your own business means that while you are grinding away at your day job you need to be investing in your future and minding your own business. Pretty soon you’ll be able to walk away from that day job and mind your own business full time.

The best way to do this is through the acquisition of real estate.

Let’s take a quick look at where you are losing all your money-taxes. Taxes have been around since 1913 in the U.S. and 1917 in Canada (even earlier in England). While the original intention was to only tax the wealthiest of the population, obviously that’s trickled down to the masses, including those in poverty.

Now, keep in mind the more money you make the more taxes you pay. The wealthy know a way of getting around this-form a corporation. Corporations offer tax benefits and protect you from lawsuits. To learn more about this talk with one of our business coaches or your attorney.

We’ve all heard the golden rule of: Pay Yourself First.

But, many of us don’t do it. Until you learn and put this rule into effect, you won’t have any chance of getting out of the rat race. What this rule does is force you to come up with more income to pay your expenses.

There are some key areas of finance you should learn about, taking classes is one of the best ways to do this. Here are the basics you should learn:

Accounting

It pays to know how to read financial statements. When acquiring businesses or assets you need to quickly see the financial standing of the company you are acquiring.

Many grown adults do not know how to balance a balance sheet. In the long term, this knowledge will pay off for you and your business.

Investment Strategy

This skill will sharpen with experience. Talk to investors and observe how they play the game.

Market Behavior

Know the laws of Supply and Demand. No business owner can do without understanding these basic principles of the market. Bill Gates saw what people needed. Open your eyes to opportunities. Look at what sells and who buys.

Law

Do everything you can to grow your business within legal boundaries. Know your corporate, state, and accounting laws.

Once you know these areas of finances you can make them work for you. The rich practically invent money. You have to know where to find a great deal. Let’s continue with real estate. Look for houses in trouble or find the court in your area that handles foreclosed, police impound or other real estate situations. You can either renovate and sell or rent for residual income.

So, essentially there are two main types of investors:

  1. Those who buy pre-packaged investments
  2. Those who create their own investments

You know which are the most successful. In order to be one of those people you need to know what to look for and how to respond.

You must:

  1. Find a good deal other people have missed.
  2. Raise the capital needed for the transaction.
  3. Put together a svelte team to execute the plan.

There is risk involved in every acquisition. The goal is not to avoid the risk, but to respond to the risk with confidence and a steady hand.

If you need help identifying potential money-makers, where to get the capital you need and how to put together a smart team, try our FREE test drive to gain access to our resources and tools.

Check it out at www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com/guidedtour

 

To Your Success,

Nancy Baki at Best Entrepreneur Solutions

www.BestEntrepreneurSolutions.com